Hi,

I’m Garrett Strong with makemoneywelding.com

I’ve been helping beginners & hobbyists learn to MIG weld online for several years now. I’ve helped thousands of people just like you get started learning to mig weld with my beginners guide to MIG welding.

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In this introduction to welding I want to share with you why MIG welding trumps all other welding processes when it comes to beginners.

Let’s take a look at the other welding processes and I think you will agree that MIG welding for beginners is the place to start.

We’ll start with stick welding.

Stick welding is widely used and has been around for a long time. It’s a great welding process but definitely not the best for beginner welders.

stick weldingFor one, when you learn stick welding there is  a pretty steep learning curve. It takes a lot of practice just to strike the arc much less lay down a nice weld.

The problem arises for beginners when you can’t clearly see the weld puddle. That’s why it’s much better to start with a MIG welder, because you can easily see the weld puddle, and it’s much easier to apply the mig welding techniques.

Stick welders produce a slag coating that comes from the flux coating on the outside of the welding rod.

This flux coating is there for a reason. It burns down along with the metal rod and creates a protective coating on the outside of the weld.welding-electrodes

This slag coating helps to prevent contamination in your welds from coming in contact with atmospheric gases like oxygen and nitrogen.

Again, the problem with stick welding for beginners is you don’t get to clearly see the weld puddle so it makes it hard to learn how to manipulate the liquid weld puddle.

The next option is TIG (tungsten inert gas) welding.

This welding process is more advanced than stick or MIG welding, and for good reason.

tig welding 2When you are TIG welding you are holding a torch in one hand, dipping a filler rod into the weld puddle with the other hand, and controlling your amperage with a foot pedal.

This sounds like a lot, but with lots of practice you can get the hang of it. It’s definitely a much higher learning curve though.

However, TIG welding makes beautiful welds, and if you’ve ever looked at a weld that looks like a stack of dimes then it was probably done using the TIG process.

Now, for those beginner welding projects or DIY welding projects you can feel free to choose whichever process you like.

I just want to first give you 3 reasons why MIG welding is going to the best option for beginners.

Reason #1 Why MIG Welding Is For Beginners: You Can Clearly See The Weld Puddle

For those of you who are brand new to welding and want to learn to weld online, I can’t stress enough how important it is to learn how to control the heat and the learn to weld fastweld puddle.

If you can learn to manipulate the weld puddle where it needs to go then half the battle is already won. That’s what’s so great about mig welding for beginners.

Not only is it super easy to learn how to mig weld, but you’ll get a chance to start welding with a process where you can see the liquid weld puddle. This will allow you to learn how to control the heat better.

You won’t get this advantage with a stick welder because it’s harder to see the weld pool.

Reason #2 Why MIG Welding Is For Beginners: You Can Weld Continuously Without Stopping

Since a MIG welder contains a roll of wire inside the machine, it continuously feeds the electrode which melts and creates the weld bead.

You can weld for longer periods of time, and you won’t have to stop to change electrodes like you would if you were stick welding.

Reason #3 Why MIG Welding Is For Beginners: There Is No Slag Produced Which Means No Smoke

Lastly, when you are MIG welding you aren’t producing any slag (unless you’re using flux core wire) because you have a shielding gas that protects the weld puddle from contamination.

If you want to learn how to MIG weld like a pro, download my free report MIG Welding Mastery while it’s available.

Thanks,

Garrett Strong


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